Tag Archives: Interactive Story

Minecraft Story Mode review – Telling tales about Telltale

So, a Telltale Game… Excellent! I get to tell you that Telltale have made another game along the formula of “a point-and-click, character-based, interactive-story with rapid decisions made during dialogue, minor puzzle-solving, and several major decisions made over the course of the game which will have supposedly far-reaching consequences within the scope of the game?” *Gasping inhale* I get to repeat all of that, tell you my few niggles about the game and then recommend it to you… Again… EXCEPT this isn’t the case. While the game does stick to the forumla, I can rather gleefully inform you that Minecraft Story Mode, is utterly fucking DREADFUL! Oooh, I’ve been looking forward to this happening!

Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons review – Review: Some Writing on a Blog

Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons (or, more simply: “Brothers”), developed by Starbreeze Studios, is a big name now and in fact it has been since release. It has been widely praised by fans and critics and actually won Best Xbox Game at this year’s Spike’s video game awards (because I can’t stand calling it “VGX”), beating heavy hitters like Bioshock Infinite and GTA:V. Most especially it has received praise for it’s writing, it’s looks and overall feel. I’m a bit behind the times in that I’ve only managed to play through it now over Christmas. In Brothers you play as both of a pair of brothers simultaneously, making it a surprisingly unique game in which you essentially  have to co-operate with yourself in order to solve a series of uncomplicated puzzles. Designed specifically for XBLA the left analogue stick and left trigger control older Bieber-esque brother while the right analogue stick and trigger control the younger, blonde mop-top brother. Each brother also has unique “gameplay” abilities, with Bieber-hair being stronger (ironically) and Beatles-hair being smaller and nimbler.  With both of these protagonists at your fingertips it is up to you to go on a grand scope fantasy adventure to find some special plant which will save your seriously ill father. This is done across a vast fantasy world in which the two brothers have to interact with the environment and work with each other in order to progress.

Katawa Shoujo review – Oh, Japan…

Most games I tend to hear about either via friends or gaming news websites. I don’t particularly claim to be an expert (although you should probably treat me as such… You may call me Professor Sabor117 from now on…) but I do consider myself pretty clued up on the goings on of the Gaming world. So when I heard about Katawa Shoujo on an online image board (because I am indeed a denizen of the internet) and nowhere else I admit I was intrigued. Even more intriguing, and indeed surprising, was the general reaction of the internet to the game. It’s a common thing on the internet to find a post which people can claim “gave me a feel” and usually the feel in question will be one of sadness or depression. Something which essentially evokes the following reaction: “Lie down. Try not to cry. Cry a lot.” Katawa Shoujo apparently gave so many people feels that the whole internet was abuzz for a fair amount of time about just how wonderful the game was, how the stories (or some of the stories in particular) spread feels about in every direction with no regard for manliness or lifting ability. And fresh from the truly heart-wrenching experience of The Walking Dead I was more than ready to pull out my handkerchief again. 

To the Moon – Vicarious sobbing still counts

This is definitely one of the odder reviews in my time, not because of the game itself, but because I never actually played the game I am reviewing. This would normally mean that any review I could possibly write on the subject would be completely null and void (for what is the point of reviewing a game you haven’t played, that doesn’t make any sense). However! I would like to suggest you read on for reasons which I will explain momentarily. The game in question is the indie, story-based, self-styled  “Adventure RPG” To The Moon, developed by Freebird Games. The game uses pixel arts and pixel sprites for graphics, is £6.99 on steam and has received numerous awards for it’s outstanding nature. The game’s protagonists are the Doctors Neil Watts and Eva Rosalene who work for a company which grants dying people their final wishes. In a blend between Inception and Total Recall this company sends it’s Doctors into patients minds to give them false memories of whatever they choose so that they can die happy (in the game lore these artificial memories clash with the real ones and so cannot be done with a person still alive). The game follows the two of the Doctors as they travel through the memories of one Johnny Wyles, slowly jumping backwards in time through his mind in order to plant his final desire to go to the Moon into his mind so that he can die happy, in the process they are privy to some of the biggest and most stand-out memories of his life.