Tag Archives: roguelike

5 Games in 5 Minutes: Episode 1 – Day of Infamy, 8-Bit Invaders, DeSync, We Need to Go Deeper, Space Hulk Deathwing

5 Games in 5 Minutes does exactly what it says on the tin. We have a number of games which we are either too busy or are simply not worth playing fully. With these games it is difficult to provide a full and accurate review. So, instead, we briefly play the game (enough to garner a decent first impression) and then quickly give you the run-down in one minute. It is designed to give you a quick impressions of a few smaller games to see whether or not it will pique your fancy.

My Thoughts On: Runers – I hunger for magic!

Runers by Let’s Get Kraken Games is a top-down, indie, rogue-like adventure game, which makes it absolute nerd-bait because us folk love it when someone says “indie” or “rogue-like” or “permadeath”. Wait, hang on, no, I hate it when people say “permadeath”. Godammit! Anyway, it’s a pretty fun little game which takes a lot after the immensely popular Binding of Issac but also then adds the element of spellcrafting with over 250 unique spells available for discovery and usage within the game. It’s a game that I personally feel is best described by it’s gameplay, as there really is no other element to it, and so I figured that instead of reviewing it I would simply create a My Thoughts On of the game so that I could voice my few criticisms and raise whatever points I could about the game whilst also showing you as much of the gameplay as I can given that I cannot play the game for shit. Anyway, check it out after the jump!

FTL review – Playing as part of the Empire has never felt better

FTL is one of the poster-boys for Kickstarter campaigns. It’s the heart-warming and fun-filled story of how two men, Matthew Davis and Justin Ma (and their company Subset Games), were making a video game and turned to the gaming community for aid in their time of need. Because the gaming community was their only hope. And things went decidedly well for them as people threw money at their computers hard enough that they managed to raise over $200,000 for development of the game. And the success didn’t stop there either, because after they finished development and released it out into the wild it got positive reviews and responses all across and board and currently has sales figures somewhere above 500k. In short, it is the perfect example of why Kickstarter is used by so many hopeful indie games companies today and why so many of those might actually let people down. “What?! But it’s an indie Kickstarter project! Why is it not good?”